Interviewing

Folder: Interview prep

The folder above contains the following documents:

  • File: Prep. – (1) Introduction.docx
    • A document I made with some general advice about interviewing, specifically in panel interviews.
  • File: Prep. – (2) Healthcare Systems.docx
    • A document that I made to simply explain the Canadian healthcare system, and how it compares to the U.S., France, and the U.K.
  • File: Prep. – (3) Current Events in Healthcare.docx
    • A document I made to introduce ongoing problems and discussions in healthcare on a local, national, and international level, and offers to potential solutions and points of discussion. (note: this document was made in 2018, so use discretion and be sure to do your own research on current events for this year).
  • File: Prep. – (5) Ethics.docx
    • A document I made that introduces a ‘pipeline’ approach to reasoning out ethical problems, and in the latter part of the document I introduce major ethical topics such as confidentially, beneficience, truth-telling, etc. Medical ethics are really important for the CASPer and MMI-style interviews. I suggest readingDoing Rightby Philip C. Hebert – it’s a very digestible introduction to medical ethics with great examples, and written by a Canadian. I read it twice.
  • File: Prep. – (6) Conflict Resolution.docx
    • Document that I made to introduce some basics of conflict resolution.
  • File: Prep. – (7) Empathy, Compassion, & Understanding.docx
    • Document that I made to offer some great phrases to convey your compassion/empathy etc.
  • File: An Overview of Aboriginal Health.pdf
    • A great resource that I found online, introduces Aboriginal health in Canada, and the problems that remain.
  • File: Big List of All Med School Interview Questions.pdf
    • Found it online, during my interview prep I went through pretty much every question in this list, and made sure I had an example that I could bring to mind. I didn’t script my answers, but it’s really important to have an example ‘on deck’ so that you can answer confidently during your interview.
  • File: Big List of MMI Questions.pdf
    • Found it online, good for practicing ethical scenarios. I used a number of different sources to produce my own ‘pipeline’ approach to answering ethics problems, which can be found below in the ethics document above.

how to write a post-interview Letter of Intent:
  • WebpagE: Letter of Intent: General Information
    • A website that introduces the idea of a letter of intent.
  • WebpagE: Letter of Intent: Example
    • A great example, I used this as a loose template when writing my letter of intent.
  • WebpagE: Letter of Intent: Writing tips 
    • Useful tips on how to write your letter of intent.
  • WebpagE: Letter of Intent: Timing tips
    • A Reddit discussion that talks about when you should send your letter of intent. Personally, I sent a letter right after my interview thank them for the opportunity to interview, and then a week later I sent my letter of intent, before the first round of offers, to show that I was keen.


A simple way to improve your interview answers:

  • The interviewers don’t necessarily care how many hours of volunteering or extracurriculars that you’ve done, they care about what you learned from them, and how you can apply it. They expect you to use your experiences to answer questions in the interview, even if they don’t specifically ask for it. For example, say they ask you: “How would you go about solving a conflict between you and a coworker?”, you could start by saying “I would solve the conflict like this…”, but there’s a much better way to answer… start with something like “Great question, and I can answer this from experience because this was something that I faced in a previous job/position”. Then go on to explain what happened, and how you handled it. You can also tie it back into medicine at the end if it feels appropriate, for example: “I believe that the ability to resolve conflict in the work place is an invaluable asset to have as a member of a healthcare team – conflicts in a clinical setting are unavoidable, and having a skillset that allows you to diffuse tense situations will improve relationships in the workplace and ultimately increase health outcomes for patients”. See what I did there? At face-value, the question could be answered with hypotheticals (“I would solve the conflict like this…”), but instead you’ve spun the question to include personal experiences, AND you’ve tied it back into medicine. This will drastically improve your answer. It’s about reading into what the interviewer really wants to hear from you.

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